Money and Happiness in the U.S. – Better Life Index

Better Life Index, just released by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).
Americans’ household wealth is about $102,000 on average, significantly higher than those in many other developed countries. Income inequality is high, however, with the top 20 percent of the population earning nearly $82,000 a year while the bottom 20 percent get by

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An Agile Workforce: Education Should Help People Adapt to Technology Careers

Technology is affecting our job market, our incomes and prosperity.
We haven’t done a good job adapting to technology as a society, as measured by unemployment and wage levels. We need agility in our workforce. Our institutions of education could help us. They can teach us to be more adaptable and provide us with tactical training,

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Rethinking Housing: The Meaning of Homeownership has Changed

The meaning of homeownership has changed.
Here is what it means to be sensible about buying a home:

You should save up at least a 20 percent down payment.
You should get a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage.
You should spend no more than 30 percent of your gross income on housing.
If you have student loans or credit-card debt as well

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Happiness: Wealth Contributes to our Abstract Sense of Happiness

The five happiest countries in the world–Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden and the Netherlands–are all clustered in the same region, and all enjoy high levels of wealth and prosperity.
“The Scandinavian countries do really well,” says Jim Harter, a chief scientist at Gallup, which developed the poll. “One theory why is that they have their basic

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